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Bruce Kovner retires: a Market Wizard's career

Bruce Kovner is stepping down as chairman and CEO of Caxton Associates, the hedge fund he founded in 1983. 

Bloomberg has the details on the transition that will see CIO Andrew Law take over at Caxton: 

"...“After 34 years in the trading business and more than 28 years leading Caxton, the time has come to hand the leadership of the company to a new generation,” Kovner, 66, wrote in the letter. “I do so knowing that I will miss the adrenalin rush of confronting markets every day but also confident that new leadership will carry on the traditions, style and substance of Caxton’s successful history.”...
...Kovner is attempting a rare handover of power in the $2 trillion hedge-fund industry, where some of the most successful managers, including Stanley Druckenmiller and George Soros, chose to transform their firms into family offices rather than put another trader in charge. A family office usually oversees money for a wealthy individual and their relatives." 

And a note on Kovner's successor Law, who offers up some interesting comments on lessons learned from Bruce Kovner and similarities in their trading styles:

"...Law’s trading style has always been similar to Kovner’s, he said in an interview in his office on Park Avenue in Manhattan. Yet the older man drove home some important lessons.
“I’ve learned to listen to the markets more,” said Law, meaning that he pays close attention to how markets move relative to one another, and how they react to events. He depends on these observations, rather than what he calls “abstract fundamental preconceptions,” to forecast future price movements.
Law also embraces Kovner’s practice of cutting risk when he doesn’t understand what’s going on in markets, something that Law did in May and June of this year. “Bruce has done this many times in his career,” he said."

Kovner is a true trading legend whose trading career really took off once he joined Commodities Corporation in late 1976. On his performance as a hedge fund manager, Financial Times sums up his 28 years thusly: "An investment of $1,000 in Caxton made when the firm began trading in 1983 would today be worth $168,000.".  

Kovner sat down for a rare interview with Jack Schwager in 1989. The resulting chapter on "Bruce Kovner - The World Trader" can be found on page 31 of this Market Wizards ebook. Check it out.
Related articles and posts

1.  Bruce Kovner interview with AR magazine - Absolute Return.

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