Skip to main content

Weekend reading

Here's some of the reading/viewing material currently on my radar.

We've got news of that tricky Goldman Sachs code, warnings of a commercial real estate bust, oil speculation, John Meriwether's latest fund closure, macro views on commodities and the economy from Donald Coxe, and much more.

1. Links
on the recent Goldman Sachs code fiasco from Bear Mountain Bull and The Big Picture.

2. "Commercial real estate is a time bomb" - Big Picture.

3. "Whose line (of credit) is it anyway?" - Doug Wakefield and Ben Hill on abuses in government and the banking sector.

4. Weekend links from Upsidetrader, a key member of the Stocktwits trading community.

5. "Why there should be more oil speculation, not less". A viewpoint article from Time magazine of all places. I believe it was written by someone who understands the futures market, so it actually makes uncommon sense. Hat tip to Charles at Smoking Securities.

6. Some thoughts on monetizing real-time web (hat tip: Howard Lindzon) and video of the Techcrunch panel discussion with tech investors Ron Conway and John Borthwick.

7. "When it comes to liberty, there can be no balance. Liberty abides no compromise. Liberty is an absolute.
" - Tom Mullen, Campaign for Liberty. This is a MUST READ piece for anyone who values liberty and personal freedom.

8. Prieur at Investment Postcards hips us to the latest Donald Coxe webcast on the markets and the economy. Very interesting comments on US stimulus packages and more.

9. Five for the Weekend. An always interesting selection of links on investing, world news, and economics from Controlled Greed.

10. "The storms that swept away Meriwether's flagship fund" - Financial Times notes that JM's relative value fund strategy relied on (now withdrawn) excess leverage to succeed, and that Meriwether was slow to cut losses, added to losing positions (shades of Bill Miller).

11. Hugh Hendry talks with FT.com about bond yields, inflation vs. deflation, and more.


Enjoy the articles, videos, and webcasts we've assembled here for you. I hope they provide some helpful insights for the weeks and months ahead.

If you like what you see and would like to keep up with all our posts and news updates, you can subscribe to the Finance Trends RSS blog feed and follow us on Twitter. You're all set!

Popular posts from this blog

The Dot-Com Bubble in 1 Chart: InfoSpace

With all the recent talk of a new bubble in the making, thanks in part to the Yellen Fed's continued easy money stance , I thought it'd be instructive to revisit our previous stock market bubble - in one quick chart. So here's what a real stock market bubble looks like.  Here's what a bubble *really* looks like. InfoSpace in 1999-2001. $QQQ $BCOR pic.twitter.com/xjsMk433H7 — David Shvartsman (@FinanceTrends) February 24, 2015   For those of you who are a little too young to recall it, this is a chart of InfoSpace at the height of the Nasdaq dot-com bubble in 1999-2001. This fallen angel soared to fantastic heights only to plummet back down to earth as the bubble, and InfoSpace's shady business plan , turned to rubble. As detailed in our post, " Round trip stocks: Momentum booms and busts ", InfoSpace rocketed from under $100 a share to over $1,300 a share in less than six months.  In a pattern common to many parabolic shooting stars, the s

Jesse Livermore: How to Trade in Stocks (1940 Ed. E-book)

If you've been around markets for any length of time, you've probably heard of 20th century supertrader, Jesse Livermore . Today we're highlighting his rare 1940 work, How to Trade in Stocks (ebook, pdf). But first, a brief overview of Livermore's life and trading career (bio from Jesse Livermore's Wikipedia entry). "During his lifetime, Livermore gained and lost several multi-million dollar fortunes. Most notably, he was worth $3 million and $100 million after the 1907 and 1929 market crashes, respectively. He subsequently lost both fortunes. Apart from his success as a securities speculator, Livermore left traders a working philosophy for trading securities that emphasizes increasing the size of one's position as it goes in the right direction and cutting losses quickly. Ironically, Livermore sometimes did not follow his rules strictly. He claimed that lack of adherence to his own rules was the main reason for his losses after making his 1907 and

New! Finance Trends now at FinanceTrendsLetter.com

Update for our readers: Finance Trends has a new URL!  Please bookmark our new web address at Financetrendsletter.com Readers sticking with RSS updates should point your feed readers to our new Finance Trends feedburner .   Thank you to all of our loyal readers who have been with us since the early days. Exciting stuff to come in the weeks ahead! As a quick reminder, you can subscribe to our free email list to receive the Finance Trends Newsletter . You'll receive email updates about once every 4-8 weeks (about 2-3 times per quarter).  Stay up to date with our real-time insights and updates on Twitter .