Skip to main content

In memory: Bennet Sedacca and Thomas Dorman

"Don't fight the darkness; bring the light, and darkness will disappear" - Maharishi Mahesh Yogi.

It may seem difficult to pay tribute to someone who you've never even met, but I think it is important to honor the people who have been a force for good in this life. This post is dedicated to the lives of Bennet Sedacca (who died suddenly this week at age 50) and Thomas Dorman (who also died unexpectedly last week at age 72).

Bennet Sedacca was a professional investor and writer. His articles appeared regularly at Minyanville.com, and were often circulated throughout the web by other investors, traders, and bloggers.

In recent months, Sedacca wrote frankly about corruption in the new bailout economy and an encroaching socialism put in place through a mixture of poor judgement and undemocratic policies from above.

It was his great hope that the USA would not go too far down this terrible road, that we would somehow right ourselves as a society, and that his profession (Wall Street investor services) would reclaim its honor and refocus on serving its clients and their goals.

Thomas Dorman, MD, was a very interesting person who was (unfortunately) unknown to me until his recent passing.

Lew Rockwell has provided a very worthwhile post in memory of Dorman's life at the Mises economics blog (see above link), with an added link to a recent podcast interview he did with Dr. Dorman on "The Medical Mess".

I don't know much about Thomas Dorman's unique views on medicine, but I do know that his ideas on government intervention in healthcare are highly relevant to what is going on in the healthcare industry (think about that term for a moment) at this time.

Please listen to this articulate discussion and you'll hear why Dr. Dorman, using his professional and personal insight, was so forthright in speaking out about the changes going on in this country today.

I hope you'll take a few moments (or more) to not only learn about Bennet Sedacca and Thomas Dorman, but to also think about how you can, in your own way, work to "bring the light".

Popular posts from this blog

Jesse Livermore: How to Trade in Stocks (1940 Ed. E-book)

If you've been around markets for any length of time, you've probably heard of 20th century supertrader, Jesse Livermore . Today we're highlighting his rare 1940 work, How to Trade in Stocks (ebook, pdf). But first, a brief overview of Livermore's life and trading career (bio from Jesse Livermore's Wikipedia entry). "During his lifetime, Livermore gained and lost several multi-million dollar fortunes. Most notably, he was worth $3 million and $100 million after the 1907 and 1929 market crashes, respectively. He subsequently lost both fortunes. Apart from his success as a securities speculator, Livermore left traders a working philosophy for trading securities that emphasizes increasing the size of one's position as it goes in the right direction and cutting losses quickly. Ironically, Livermore sometimes did not follow his rules strictly. He claimed that lack of adherence to his own rules was the main reason for his losses after making his 1907 and

New! Finance Trends now at FinanceTrendsLetter.com

Update for our readers: Finance Trends has a new URL!  Please bookmark our new web address at Financetrendsletter.com Readers sticking with RSS updates should point your feed readers to our new Finance Trends feedburner .   Thank you to all of our loyal readers who have been with us since the early days. Exciting stuff to come in the weeks ahead! As a quick reminder, you can subscribe to our free email list to receive the Finance Trends Newsletter . You'll receive email updates about once every 4-8 weeks (about 2-3 times per quarter).  Stay up to date with our real-time insights and updates on Twitter .

Moneyball: How the Red Sox Win Championships

Welcome, readers . T o get the first look at brand new posts (like the following piece) and to receive our exclusive email list updates, please subscribe to the Finance Trends Newsletter .   The Boston Red Sox won their fourth World Series title of t he 21st century this we ek. Having won their first Se ries in 86 years back in 200 4, the last decade-plus has marked a very strong return to form for one of baseball's oldest big league clubs. So how did they do it? Quick background: in late 2002, team own er and hedge fund manager, John W. Henry (with his partners ) bought the Boston Red Sox and its historic Fenway Park for a reported sum of $ 695 million. Henry and Co. quickly set out to find their ideal General Manager (GM) to help turn around their newly acquired, ailing ship. This brings us to one of my fav orite scenes from the 2011 film , Moneyball , in which John W. Henry (played by Ar liss Howard) attempts to woo Oakland A's GM Billy Beane (Brad Pi