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Features of the week

What's driving events in this crazy world of ours this week? Join us as we follow the money trail in this Friday's, "Features of the week".

1. Let's expand domestic spying, and grant telecoms immunity.

2. Midwest floods ruin crops; higher food prices to come.

3. John Paulson is bearish on UK property, and sees $1.3 trillion in losses for financial companies in the credit crisis.

4. Lieberman makes risky bet in speculation ban bid.

See also: Tighter trading laws may be boon to foreign exchanges.

5. Wilbur Ross speaks to Bloomberg about MBIA and Ambac, and says they are unlikely to regain their AAA ratings.

6. Your tax bill: how McCain, Obama differ.

7. Troubled Waters: Barron's 2008 Midyear Roundtable.

8. What recession? Shoplifting to make ends meet.

9. The Confidence Man. NY Mag profiles hedge fund manager David Einhorn, he of short Lehman Brothers fame (Hat tip to The Kirk Report).

10. Death of America's suburbs is greatly exaggerated.

11. Timeline: Bill Gates at the helm of Microsoft.

Plus: Additional Gates-Microsoft timeline from BBC.

12. China announces fuel price increase; the price hike takes Chinese fuel prices to about $78.60 a barrel.

13. Charles Maxwell of Weeden & Co. says oil prices could go north of $200 based on supply and demand fundamentals (Bloomberg News Video).

14. Oilwatch Monthly - June 2008 (The Oil Drum).

15. North Dakota's new oil barrons: Bloomberg report on the Bakken formation.

16. Hidden fees in your 401(k). Bloomberg TV report.

17. The Road to Revulsion: James Montier on the life cycle of a bubble.

18. The 'secret' to happiness... is no secret (Financial Philosopher).

Thanks for reading Finance Trends Matter. Have a great weekend!

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