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Healthy habits, longer lives

A report out today on health and longetivity shows certain health habits are associated with longer lives in men.

Want to know more? Here's an excerpt from the article, "Men Who Maintain Healthy Habits Lead Much Longer Lives ".

"BOSTON, Feb. 12 -- The same lifestyle-related factors that help men survive middle age also help them stay healthy to age 90 and beyond, researchers here said.

More than half of men in their early 70s who exercised regularly, were not obese, didn't smoke, and didn't have diabetes or high blood pressure survived to 90, reported Laurel B. Yates, M.D., M.P.H., of Brigham and Women's Hospital, and colleagues in the Feb. 11 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine."

I've included this article today because, as the saying goes, "health is wealth". And monetary wealth and achievement may often turn out to be less meaningful or enjoyable in the absence of good health.

The study's researchers note that while the findings here are not surprising, they are reassuring, and imply that healthy habits seem to improve quality of life in old age.

"Modifiable healthy behaviors during early elderly years ... are associated not only with enhanced life span in men but also with good health and function during older age," the researchers said.

Quants and other statistically-inclined people will appreciate the numbers breakdown on health risks and survival statistics in older men included in the article. No fluff for my readers!

So have a look at this article, and check out the interview with researcher Dr. Laurel Yates in the attached audio clip. Good health can pay dividends now, and when you're old.

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