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Features of the week

We've got some great stories and interviews for you in this week's installment of "Features", so kick back and browse away. You'll be a little bit more informed by the time you finish!

1. "They've Got Class". Berkshire Hathaway tops the Barron's survey of most respected companies. Hat tip to Fat Pitch Financials.

2. Marc Faber says there is, "No option for Fed except a bail out!".

3. "Major rally seen for cotton". Investors like Jim Rogers and Roland Jansen see room for this agricultural commodity to run.

4. Putin dissolves government, names Victor Zubkov as new Prime Minister.

5. Abe resigns as Japan's Prime Minister, leaving Yasuo Fukuda and Taro Aso to battle for the position.

6. Mohamed El-Erian in a recent interview with Pensions and Investments, just before his departure from Harvard Management Co. and return to Pimco.

7. Face to Face with John Paulson, of Paulson & Co. funds.

8. Financial firms such as HSBC, Merrill Lynch continue to feel the hit from subprime.

9.
Research Affiliates Chairman Rob Arnott says a subprime Bailout would be bad news.

10. China raises rates for the fifth time in 2007, but economist Andy Xie says the country is "far behind" the inflation rate

11. Gold rises as investors seek currency alternative.

12. Look here for an inflation proof currency.

13. Burj Dubai becomes the world's tallest free-standing structure.

14. "Million Dollar Mentor". SFO magazine interviews Merrill Oster,
farmer, entrepreneur, philanthropist, and futures industry pioneer.

15.
Homeschooling comes of age.

16.
Learn Mandarin Chinese in 10 easy lessons.

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