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Features of the week

We've got some interesting market and business related features to share with you, so let's launch right into our "Features of the week" without further ado. Enjoy!

1. Insider trading is all the rage these days, and between coverage of this trend, the reappearance of LBOs in the form of "private equity", and the scheduled return of Gordon Gekko, it almost feels like the late 1980's all over again.

This clip on "the new insider trading" from Bloomberg TV brings us up to date and takes us back, all at the same time.

2. China's mainland stock market, trading at 45 times earnings, is being fed by a herd mentality according to some observers.

An excellent piece from Bloomberg that illustrates the universal appeal of attaining wealth and autonomy through trading, while at the same time showing the "risky shift" behavior of crowds during a time of speculative boom.

3. Super-rich extend their lead over the merely affluent. According to FT, assets of ultra-high net worth individuals expanded by 16.8 percent, compared to the 6.4 percent growth in wealth experienced by the entry-level rich.

A study by Merrill Lynch and Cap Gemini chalks up the outsized increase to a greater zest for risk taking on the part of the very rich. Probably, they also have better access to lucrative investment vehicles and more options to choose from.

4. U.S. Supreme Court to hear Guantanamo prisoners appeals.

5. Resource nationalism continues as Hugo Chavez and Venezuela move to take control of oil producing assets in the Orinoco oil belt. Meanwhile, the oil majors tread a pragmatic path.

6. Investment Postcards hosts an economic and investment roundtable featuring Martin Barnes, John Mauldin, David Fuller, Barry Ritholtz, and Prieur du Plessis.

7. Bargains don't come wrapped with a bow, says investor Arne Alsin.

8. The Financial Philosopher relates the subprime lending fiasco to a cycle of greed.

9. John Gapper reviews the new book, Richistan, and finds a land of Bentleys, butlers, and blandness.

10. Forging Sustainable Profits With a Green Company. An excellent interview with Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard from SFO Magazine.

11. David Morgan of the Silver-Investor website tells us what's happening with gold and silver prices in this radio interview with the Korelin Economics Report.

12. Author Dan Pink speaks with Econtalk about his book, A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future.

That's it. Have a great weekend, everyone, and enjoy!

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