Skip to main content

Features of the week

We've got a lot of information to share in this Friday's edition of our "Features of the week".

And while I'm definitely a proponent of being selective when it comes to information, I do hope you'll all take some time to check out these article features which cover a number of different, and fascinating, topics. Having said that, enjoy!

1. "Good Companies, Bad Karma". A Q&A discussion with marketing guru Jagdish Seth.

2. "Freedom, not climate, is at risk". An FT comment by Vaclav Klaus.

3. The cost of gasoline around the world. Excellent graph and analysis from The Oil Drum.

4. There's a downside to Alberta's oil boom and it comes in the form of soaring rents and shortages in education, recreational opportunities, and medical services.

5. Building cities in the desert sand. Prince Fahd bin Sultan and construction mogul Bahaa Hariri hope to build megacities in Saudi Arabia where desert now stands.

Will their long term plans be hampered by the onset of peak oil and higher energy prices?

6. Is there a bubble in the Chinese stock market? Are valuations in India too high? Will a market plunge in China spread to other Asian stock markets or is the speculative mania confined to the Chinese mainland?

These, and other important questions, are hashed out by noted investors such as, Mark Mobius, Jim Rogers, and Marc Faber, in "Chinese Checkers".

7. Political turmoil creates a buying opportunity in Thailand.

8. A Motley Fool interview with value investor Mohnish Pabrai. Parts one and two of "Pabrai's Perspectives on Investing". Thanks to David Hui Lau for sharing these links.

9. The Financial Philosopher wonders if financial blogs are making the markets more efficient.

10. John Rubino interviews Bill Laggner and Kevin Duffy of Bearing Fund LP, and the talk turns to "value traps" in the market.

11. Richard Russell remembers when a dime bought a loaf of bread, but then, "I'm an old-timer...".

12. Doug Wakefield and Ben Hill discuss debt, the economy, and the outlook for the markets as seen through the viewpoints of two fictitious investors in, "Ed 'N' Earl".

Further to the points made in the Wakefield/Hill article about the Great Depression, some reference links courtesy of the Mises Institute:

*America's Great Depression, by Murray N. Rothbard.
*Banking And The Business Cycle (PDF), by C.A. Phillips, T.F. MacManus, and R.W. Nelson.

13. "Toxic Debt: The Poison In Your Pension". Bloomberg Markets reports that banks are selling the riskiest part of collateralized debt obligations (CDOs) to public pension funds. You know what they say, "Caveat Emptor".

14. Newsweek reports on a $3 gadget that provides safe drinking water. Hat tip to The Kirk Report for this article.

15. Fintag and friends worry about an upcoming June correction and the possibility of a fall crash. Are they jivin'?

16. NYMEX explores a sale as the CME sweetens its offer for the hotly pursued CBOT.

17. Americans are less happy today than 30 years ago, according to an Italian study.

18. Whitney Tilson shares some not-to-be-missed tips for value investors.

19. Edward Chancellor takes an imaginary look back at Blackstone Group's tenure as a publicly traded company. Hat tip to Abnormal Returns.

That's all, friends! Enjoy your weekend.

Popular posts from this blog

Jesse Livermore: How to Trade in Stocks (1940 Ed. E-book)

If you've been around markets for any length of time, you've probably heard of 20th century supertrader, Jesse Livermore . Today we're highlighting his rare 1940 work, How to Trade in Stocks (ebook, pdf). But first, a brief overview of Livermore's life and trading career (bio from Jesse Livermore's Wikipedia entry). "During his lifetime, Livermore gained and lost several multi-million dollar fortunes. Most notably, he was worth $3 million and $100 million after the 1907 and 1929 market crashes, respectively. He subsequently lost both fortunes. Apart from his success as a securities speculator, Livermore left traders a working philosophy for trading securities that emphasizes increasing the size of one's position as it goes in the right direction and cutting losses quickly. Ironically, Livermore sometimes did not follow his rules strictly. He claimed that lack of adherence to his own rules was the main reason for his losses after making his 1907 and

New! Finance Trends now at FinanceTrendsLetter.com

Update for our readers: Finance Trends has a new URL!  Please bookmark our new web address at Financetrendsletter.com Readers sticking with RSS updates should point your feed readers to our new Finance Trends feedburner .   Thank you to all of our loyal readers who have been with us since the early days. Exciting stuff to come in the weeks ahead! As a quick reminder, you can subscribe to our free email list to receive the Finance Trends Newsletter . You'll receive email updates about once every 4-8 weeks (about 2-3 times per quarter).  Stay up to date with our real-time insights and updates on Twitter .

Moneyball: How the Red Sox Win Championships

Welcome, readers . T o get the first look at brand new posts (like the following piece) and to receive our exclusive email list updates, please subscribe to the Finance Trends Newsletter .   The Boston Red Sox won their fourth World Series title of t he 21st century this we ek. Having won their first Se ries in 86 years back in 200 4, the last decade-plus has marked a very strong return to form for one of baseball's oldest big league clubs. So how did they do it? Quick background: in late 2002, team own er and hedge fund manager, John W. Henry (with his partners ) bought the Boston Red Sox and its historic Fenway Park for a reported sum of $ 695 million. Henry and Co. quickly set out to find their ideal General Manager (GM) to help turn around their newly acquired, ailing ship. This brings us to one of my fav orite scenes from the 2011 film , Moneyball , in which John W. Henry (played by Ar liss Howard) attempts to woo Oakland A's GM Billy Beane (Brad Pi